What Do Millennials Want in Office Space?

Now that millennials have entered the workforce, we should understand their preferences to create productive office environments that attract talent.

A millennial is anyone born between 1982 and 2000. When people read those dates, they are always shocked. There’s usually someone who says “I didn’t realize I was a millennial.”

Millennials account for 25% of the American population. They are the largest generation in the workforce, bigger than the Baby Boomers by almost 10 million. Even though millennials are one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse generations, they’ll be pushing some broad trends into their work environments.

It’s no surprise that companies go out of their way to seduce talented people. If you’re smart, you’ll find out what your ideal employee wants and build an office environment that suits them.

That’s a critical strategy for hiring millennial employees, who change jobs every one to four years. According to State Street Global Advisors, 44% of millennials plan to leave their current position in the next two years, which means keeping them around is harder than previous generations.

You don’t need orange slides that wind between floors or treehouse offices to attract and retain millennials, but you should make these concessions.

Before you hire millennials, make sure you understand these common myths.

The end of the 9 to 5

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A Bentley University study found that most millennials prefer a flexible work schedule. 77% say that open-ended work hours would make them more productive. They prioritize work/life balance over work itself, and want to be available for life experiences.

The same study found that 80% of millennials are willing to check work messages and contribute to company goals well after work hours. Interestingly, they integrate their job functions into their life, so that responding to a work email at a restaurant or taking a quick phone call on Sunday doesn’t feel like an interruption, so long as personal interruptions are permitted during work hours.

How does this preference affect your office space? To court millennials, you should provide an accessible office. Give them access during nontraditional work hours, even if it means giving everyone a key. Let them use their own tools (laptops and phones) so work is always available. Most importantly, stop thinking of an empty chair as poor work ethic. Instead, measure results.

Your tech should be cutting edge

Millennials were born into technology. The oldest millennials have been using cell phones since they were in high school. The youngest had smart phones in elementary school. They work, socialize, and live their lives through technology.

Art Papas, CEO of Bullhorn, Inc., says it perfectly: “Millennials don’t look at technology as an extra. They expect to be able to use it in all aspects of their lives, including at home, in the community, and on the job.”

Millennials look for ways to make their jobs easier and faster. They want the flexibility that can only be achieved with modern technology. Don’t burden them with ancient computers. Be prepared to pay for that premium software tool. That said, many millennials are comfortable with “bring your own device” policies because it gives them freedom to work wherever and whenever they please (which could save you money).

Furthermore, give your younger, computer literate team members the freedom to implement and design their own tools. If you give them the tools you need, they will reward you with productivity.

Open office layouts aren’t what they seem

Image source: K2 Space / Flickr
Image source: K2 Space / Flickr

For years now, there has been a push for giant, open floor plans where everyone works in the same room. The idea is that millennials value communication and collaboration, so companies have literally attempted to break down barriers between employees. In fact, research shows that newer offices have been deliberately designed to represent the open spaces of college work/study environments. Fewer walls mean more talking, right?

Sure, but that’s not always a good thing. Open spaces create a pressure to look busy. When a CEO walks into the room, everyone wants to be at their desk, seemingly at work, even if collaboration (which is good work in the context of an open space) is better performed at the water cooler.

Furthermore, open offices are distracting. An employee’s productivity and creativity are squashed when everyone nearby can hear their conversations. This is especially important for salesmen or customer service representatives who spend a majority of their day on the phone.

Laura Munoz, saleswomen at Groupon, told Monster, “I loved feeling part of that community but as an inside sales rep I hated having people listen to all of my conversations. It was to an extent nice to pick up sales tips from listening to others, but it really made me act differently—either carefree or totally nervous. And of course, there was the occasional private conversation that you wish you didn’t hear.”

Nevertheless, open offices do create a sense of community that translates into job satisfaction. So how do you foster that community without damaging productivity? For small companies, the solution is to find out what your employees want and provide that layout.

Larger companies see success by offering a concept called “hoteling.” The idea is to provide different types of work environments to staff and let them work wherever they please. This means having an open workspace for collaboration and impromptu meetings, as well as quiet, reserved space for concentration. Technology being what it is means people can easily relocate workspace depending on their needs.

Sprinkle in some amenities

office-amenities

Happy employees are productive employees. (There’s really no need to back that up with science, but here it is anyway.) If you smooth out their frustrations, ease their fears, and solve their problems, you’ll create a workforce that gets more done and stays with your company for the long haul.

Some of the biggest companies have made tremendous investments into employee incentives, like personal concierge services, free catered food at all hours, free childcare, on-site gyms, and free laundry service. But those are likely out of your budget.

Still, you can easily improve your employee’s happiness and job satisfaction without giving them raises. Figure out what would make their lives easier that can be solved within your budget.

Does your team of five drink coffee throughout the day? Free coffee for a small team would only cost a few hundred dollars per year, but it would make your team grateful and productive. No late arrivals because the coffee line was long. No mid-day jaunts to the convenience store.

Does your staff like to educate themselves continually? You could reimburse a portion of their tuition or send them to industry conferences. Do they take fitness seriously? Pay for nearby gym memberships (you could probably get a group rate!).

Most importantly, a little perk for your employees makes your company known. You can be the business that lets employees bring their dogs to work, or the office with bagels every morning. Word will spread that will help you attract larger pools of job applicants.

Download our guide: Myths You Need to Stop Believing About Millennial Employees

A final word

I’ve done a lot of generalizing in this article about a large group of people, but at the end of the day, you should create an office environment (and a business, for that matter) that makes your company the most successful.

Maybe your millennials need beer kegs, a ping pong table, and Spotify subscriptions. Maybe they want traditional cubicles and taupe-colored walls. The only way to find out what makes them productive is to ask. Use that data to create a work environment that maximizes your chance for success.

Ready to find a new office? Find your next office environment today.

4D Printing and a New Wave of Office Technology

Technology advancement never ceases to amaze business professionals when it comes to everyday practical use.  Remember the days where office equipment technology was at its infancy?  As the 21st century surges forward we as the workforce are becoming more reluctant to work in an environment where office equipment doesn’t provide a competitive edge. Office equipment has driven innovation in communications, working styles and even in the value placed on certain skill sets.  Geography is no longer a barrier to doing business, nor are business travelers cut off from communications infrastructure that support their work.  It is difficult to predict the office and landscape of the 21st century. Trends point to smarter and faster technology that will be capable of carrying out more complex functions with minimal human input.

4d-printing

Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is itself an emerging technology and has in fact been around for over 30 years! It is continuously being reported that 3D printing is now becoming more mainstream, but is still very heavily underutilized in the business world, considering its potential.  The potential to economically and time efficiently 3D print ANYTHING is an irresistible proposition. 3D printed materials is not the end of the story though, there are techniques to create materials/objects which can be pre-programmed to operate in a certain way.  Pretty amazing technology, what if I told you there is technology being worked on that would make 3D printing a thing of the past?

4D printing may be bursting onto the scene and leaving people in absolute awe.  Think of 4D printing as the same as 3D printing with the addition of time. By adding time to 3D printing the concept of 4D printing is born. This enables objects to be pre-programmed in various ways to react to a range of different stimuli.

4D printing is futuristic and a very exciting future at that. 4D printing delivers the possibility of designing ANY transformable shape, which can be made from a large selection of materials. These different materials will have many different properties and a range of potential applications and uses. There is a real opportunity for the creation of dynamic self-assembling objects which could transform and be used in a wide range of industries and in a large number of applications.

Research has cited examples such as the water systems of office buildings reshaping itself to efficiently allow water to be processed with minimal cost.  That very same office building can house a company that develop 4D sportswear/sports equipment that adapts its shape to its user and how they are performing when their body temperature of environment changes around them.  The possibilities seem endless. As time goes on 4D printing may just end up being available at your finger tips literally.  The cup you drink from, the desk you use for your work station to office building production.

4D Printing will play a key role in future production.  Making this happen on a human scale, is much more challenging, particularly in more traditional industries, such as building construction.  There is potential,in using self-assembling materials in disaster areas or extreme environments where conventional construction is not feasible or too expensive however. We might one day experience a future of adaptive infrastructure. In extreme cases we can apply this technology to  geographic locations that are notorious for producing earthquakes.  Just imagine where technology has come from.  If we can help save lives based on a concept that originated over 30 years ago.  Maybe one day constructing a building from 4D printing will be the norm.  Now that is technology.

When To Take A Break At Work

Many of us are spending more and more of our workdays sitting in front of a desk managing tasks virtually.

In fact, the recently coined phrase “actively sedentary” refers to a new category of office workers who attempt to compensate for sitting 8-10 hrs a day by engaging in at least 60 minutes of daily exercise. While the effort is valiant, recent studies have shown that this amount of exercise is not nearly enough to offset the negative effects caused from sitting all day. Is there anything else that we, as the “actively sedentary” workforce, can do to make up for the long periods of time we remain stationary at our desks? Believe it or not, the answer may be as simple as taking more breaks.

Taking mid-day breaks is something most of us do of course. The questions is whether we are taking enough of them. Many recent studies have shown that for every hour that someone sits in a chair typing away, or immersing themselves in product software, or whatever their job might entail, they should be getting 5-10 minutes of activity (walking, stretching etc). That means in an average 8-hour workday we should be getting anywhere from 40 to 80 minutes of activity.

Now of course some bosses are more lenient then others when it comes to allowing employees out for a quick walk around the block every hour. However if you manage your time well throughout the day and exhibit proper “break etiquette”, most everyone can achieve this goal and stay healthy even while sitting all day.

In order to develop a proper daily break routine at the office, you must first and foremost know when to NOT take breaks. For me this falls under three categories: When you’re “in the zone”, when it’s inappropriate to do so, and when you are under immediate time constraints. The first category deals with breaking your concentration. We all have periods of time during the day when we are more productive then others. If you find yourself “in the zone”, working quickly and efficient and knocking off you’re daily to-dos rapid-fire, don’t stop what you are doing to get up, stretch and go out to grab a coffee for you and a colleague just because it’s break time. This can completely disrupt your concentration and inhibit those productive moments. Remember, we are trying to convince the boss that short, semi-frequent breaks actually enhance overall productivity, not hinder it.

It’s also prudent to refrain from taking breaks when it would be inappropriate to do so. For example, if you just got back from lunch 5 minutes ago, or your boss asks you to do something for him or her right away, it’s probably not the best time to go out for some fresh air. Similarly, if there is a task that requires your immediate attention, or if there is an approaching deadline for that day, it can be inappropriate to take breaks.

The key is to develop an adaptable routine where you are regularly getting up to stretch or get some air, or to go for a quick walk, without it affecting your productivity and without causing too much fanfare in the office. 5-minute breaks are great for not attracting too much attention and give you enough time to stretch your legs, use the restroom, get some water etc. The 10 and especially 15-minute breaks should often be reserved for later in the day, where even the bosses start becoming a little jaded. It may be likely that you’ll go less noticed from, say 4:00-4:15pm then you will from 9:45-10:00am. Therefore, pick your times wisely and do your best to get a minimum of 40 minutes of activity every day.

On A Mission For The Best Money Exchange App

Smartphone-Apps

Last weekend, Nicola went camping in the Berkshires with a group of ten of her friends.

Someone bought groceries, a couple others drove, and another one paid for the campsite. Instead of engaging in an awkward conversation about who-owes-who-what, writing checks, and making ATM stops, Nicola’s friends “charged” her and the others whatever amounts they owed through a money transfer app called Venmo.

It’s programs like Venmo, PayPal, Square Cash, and Google Wallet that have quickly become the norm for casual payments. Instead of asking a friend to “spot you”, we’re now whipping out our phones and opening up a virtual wallet app. In 2013, there were $235 billion of transactions made through online payment systems. Gartner technology analysts estimate that there will be $720 billion of transactions through money sharing programs by 2017.

With news of the iPhone 6 featuring the Apple Wallet, an app that is partnering with Visa, Mastercard, and American Express to allow its user to make retail purchases with just the stroke of a finger, we at Turnkey Office Space have decided to evaluate our favorite money exchanging apps.

PayPal. For being the oldest payment service on the block, PayPal certainly spends a lot of time on the sidelines. Probably because the program is mostly associated with business transactions and its 2.9% +$0.30 fee it charges its pay-ers. As of late, the company has been stepping up its retail game. Over the last several months, PayPal has been partnering with eateries and small business and offering their customers discounts on their products if they pay using the app. It’s also the only service of the 4 available for Windows Phone.

Square Cash. This is the only money-exchanging app that requires only the pay-er to have an account. Square Cash and Venmo are the only programs that don’t have a service fee for debit card payments.

Google Wallet. Perhaps the most fickle of the four, Google Wallet is attached to your Gmail address and requires answering several security questions. Wallet lets you pay with credit card, which Square and Venmo don’t, but it charges 2.9% for every debit or credit card transaction.

Venmo. A Twitter-esque social media feed and check cashing center is how Venmo defines itself. When signing up, the service gives you the option to link up your Facebook profile and add “friends”. You also have the option to make your transactions public or for “friends only”, so others can check out and “like” your transactions.

Big Pharma Leaves New Jersey and Vacant Office Space Awaits Impatiently

Office-Space-New-Jersey

The pharmaceutical industry used to be a dominating force in New Jersey commerce.

However, over the last twenty years times have certainly changed. Today we see the offices these international, billion dollar pharmaceutical producers now sitting vacant. There are a few factors responsible for big pharma’s disappearance from New Jersey. The billowing tech industry is partially responsible for the evaporation of old school biotech. Companies choosing to cut costs and outsource to India and Asia is another reason. Yet, figuring out what to do with these vast, empty New Jersey office campuses is another predicament.

New Jersey is in search of a new nickname. “The Nation’s Medicine Chest” was the former home to several pharmaceutical companies including Novo Nordisk and Roche. Several pharma companies have merged, downsized, and relocated. In 2009, New York-based Pfizer bought Wisconsin-based Wyeth. Merck reduced its workforce by 15% when it purchased Schering-Plough formerly based in Summit, New Jersey. Many displaced workers have been forced to change careers. Kim Haas, a former drug designer for Wyeth and Sanofi called the transition “a bloodbath” when the drug giant abandoned its Malven, PA campus (located on the Jersey border) in 2010.

According to James W. Hughes, dean of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University, the dissipation of New Jersey’s pharmaceutical industry is due to the fact that biotech is attempting to reformat its environment to be more academically reflective. They’re moving their campuses to places like the Bay Area, Cambridge, and Manhattan where science technology is thriving in nearby universities.

So, the question remains – – what’s to become of these massive, deserted buildings? In December, Roche, the Swiss mega drug manufacturer and creator of Valium, shut down its 2 million square foot campus in Nutley, NJ. When Genentech acquired Roche in 2009 it moved to San Francisco and gradually decreased its New Jersey presence.

“Our mission for Roche is to sell the entire site at one time. So, while we have a lot of various interest in portions of the site, those that are looking at the site to purchase as a single entity are large, financially capable, integrated, multidisciplinary development-type companies.” Said Thomas Stanton, managing director of JLL, the real estate firm marketing Roche’s campus for NorthJersey.com. Stanton has toured the property to over 35 prospective buyers, but hasn’t received any bids. In the meantime, JLL is leasing a couple of the 13 buildings to small businesses. The space is perfect for biotech start-ups that need minimal lab space, but unfortunately due to financial reasons, JLL must hold out for a big spender.

Turnkey Office Space Comments on Recent San Francisco Commercial Office Space Report

San-Francisco-Office-Space

A report released earlier this month has found San Francisco office rents are projected to surpass New York City office rents in the near future.

Turnkey Office Space, a nationwide office space search service that specializes in commercial office space in major metropolitan areas, released a comment today following a new research report by CBRE, the world’s largest commercial real estate brokerage.

The report, published in Bloomberg titled “San Francisco Office Rents Seen Topping Manhattan in 2015” by Dan Levy (August 14, 2014), found that the average monthly rental charge for commercial office space on the West Coast, particularly in San Francisco, is expected to rise by the end of 2015. While San Francisco office rates are currently on average at $31.50 a square foot, they could rise as high as $69.71 a square foot by the end of next year, according to CBRE.

San Francisco has grown into a major technology hub, with currently under three-quarters of the rented commercial space occupied by technology firms and start-ups. If the rental rate increase occurs as projected, this would be the first time office space in a city on the West Coast has exceeded the cost of office space in New York City since the dot-com bubble in 2000.

According to the team at Turnkey Office Space, the commercial office space in San Francisco’s financial district is already on average pricier than downtown New York City. Nevertheless, the company has experienced increased interest in the San Francisco Bay area by current and potential clients.

The popularity of West Coast office space comes during a time when Manhattan office space construction is on pace to hit a 25 year high. Experts at Turnkey Office Space believe this could result in newly constructed office space for more affordable prices in New York City to compete with their West Coast counterpart.

For companies currently located in California, and specifically San Francisco, Jonathan Bachrach, Managing Director of Turnkey Office Space, believes the increased rental rates are driving some companies out of San Francisco. Many companies are currently searching for spaces a mere 11 miles westward in the city of Oakland, CA, where more affordable options are available.

“We, as a company, have noticed a marked increase in demand for office space in the Oakland area, where commercial office space rent is overall a cheaper investment for start-up companies,” said Bachrach. “As the city of San Francisco becomes home to the most expensive real estate in the country, we expect more small businesses to set-up shop in cities like Oakland and Berkeley. But, to be honest, I would not be surprised if we see those rental rates climb as well in the next year due to their proximity.”

About Turnkey Office Space: Turnkey Office Space is a countrywide search and consulting services for companies seeking office space. They specialize in office suites, virtual offices, and co-working spaces. Turnkey can be reached via their websitehttps://www.turnkeyofficespace.com and by phone at 1-888-282-8555.

Turnkey Office Space Releases Statement on High Growth Industries in 2014

As a leading countrywide online search service for businesses in need of office space, Turnkey Office Space recently released a statement commenting on the supply and demand of office space for High Growth Industries in New York City.

Turnkey Office Space, an office space search service, recently released a statement commenting on the need for open-plan, collaborative, Class B and C office spaces in New York City for High Growth Industries (HGIs). Company executives believe that due to a booming first quarter economy in New York City, the predicted growth of HGIs will indeed occur.

According to a May 28, 2014 Staten Island Live article titled, “New York City economy thriving, city comptroller says,” by Maura Grunlund, the highest number of New Yorkers are currently employed since 2000, leading to a “booming commercial real estate market.”
Co-founder Jonathan Bachrach believes that this recently reported growth is moving at a much faster pace than expected. “When the
‘Commercial Real Estate Competitiveness Study’ was released by late last year there was a prediction of business growth but, we never expected to see growth like this. With New York City’s economy growing faster economically than the nation’s, there is real concern for the HGI commercial real estate space.”

Bachrach, who is referencing a past December 2013 study titled, “Commercial Real Estate Competitiveness Study”, prepared by Alvarez & Marsal Real Estate Advisory Services and JRT Realty Group, Inc. for the New York City Economic Development Corporation, believes HGIs will represent the majority of growth for office space in major cities such as New York over the next 10 years. With the first quarter reports, he sees the results of this study being significantly accelerated.

According to the study, HGIs are broken up into 7 sectors: Healthcare, Education, Technology, Advertising, Business Services, Consulting, Non-Profit, and R&D. These sectors are projected to account for 60% of growth in total office space demand between 2013 and 2025.

Bachrach believes that with this recently reported first quarter growth, the demand for Class B and C office space will increase quicker than expected. “A lot of High Growth and tech firms are still in the early stages of their growth and are thus preferring class B and C spaces as opposed to higher end office space typically used by the Finance, Legal Services and Accounting sectors,” exclaimed Bachrach. “A company in a growing industry is not going to plunge straight into the best building in the area. Think about tech start-up companies; they are actively growing, but still have a certain level of risk.”

The study also found that New York City could experience a demand-supply gap in the future as real estate developers may decide to build more residential buildings over commercial buildings due to more favorable returns. While the industry has not yet reported this after first quarter, Bachrach believes that this, along with the financial status of most HGIs, will lead to a shift in what the traditional office space looks like.

To compete for top millennial talent, companies are also changing their mindset on what the office looks like, according to a November 10, 2013 article by the New York Times titled, “Embracing the Millennials’ Mind-Set at Work.” HGIs are meeting the demands of millennial workers by building out these class B and C workspaces to offer more collaboration.

“Open-plan, collaborative build-outs are increasingly becoming the norm for high growth startups and tech firms,” said Bachrach. “Since these industries are projected to represent the majority of growth in demand for office space in the future, the tendency toward the collaborative, co-working-type build-out is likely to continue.”

About Turnkey Office Space: Turnkey Office Space is a countrywide search and consulting services for companies seeking office space. They specialize in office suites, virtual offices, and co-working spaces. Turnkey can be reached via their websitehttps://www.turnkeyofficespace.com and by phone at 1-888-282-8555.

If Management Frameworks Were TV Shows…

Management Frameworks are decisive ways to boost employee moral, designate raises and develop and maintain hierarchy.

However, they’re not the most cut-and-dry systems. We at Turnkey Office Space have come up with an easy way to understand these complex ideologies. TV shows! Every company has its own particular set of expectations and cast of characters, and the same goes for sitcoms and dramas. Check out our list below!

Stack Rankings = The Bachelor

Microsoft employees took a deep sigh of relief last fall when the software magnate decided to do away with its employee-review and compensation system colloquially known as “stack ranking”. Since the 80s, Microsoft had practicing a method of pitting employees against each other and numerically grading workers’ performances. However, the system was more like highway cops trying to make their ticket quota. It required managers to collectively label a minimum of 100,000 employees as “underperformers”. The system left employees feeling belittled and unrecognized. If only Law and Order had a “Speeding Tickets” series. We’ve decided that this management framework’s prime-time counterpart is The Bachelor. Just like “stack ranking”, contestants are pitted against each other and manipulated into thinking they’ll never be good enough for a rose.

Holacracy = The Brady Bunch

Holacracy is taking over companies small and big worldwide. The concept was conceived by Hungarian-British writer, Arthur Koestler in 1967. It’s a democratic, insular management strategy that governs employees with tasks rather than authoritative figures. Workers are arranged into “circles” based on their skill sets, and every employee is selected to be in either a higher circle or a lower circle. The higher circle sets the expectations for the lower circle and thusly evaluates its performance. Circles are run autonomously without managers or supervisors and everyone makes decisions collectively. Primarily smaller corporations have found success with Holacracy, specifically Zappos being the most recent and biggest convert. Other notable companies that have hopped on the Holacratic bandwagon are Mashable, Moveline and Conscious Brands. Due to their size, it’s doubtful that mega-tech companies like Google or Facebook will ever adopt the new-age framework, but there’s no telling for sure. Holacracy’s big-family-hug nature speaks adeptly to The Brady Bunch’s tight-knit camaraderie. Carol and Mike Brady and Alice are the higher circle, while Greg, Marcia, Peter, Jan, Bobby and Cindy are the lower circle. Both circles are open and honest with each other, and despite the arguments and rivalries, they value respect and family above all.

Virtual Office Space Helps Broaden Company’s Reach

A leader in helping companies find office space, Turnkey Office Space, released a recent statement asserting that virtual offices are becoming a trend for companies who want to increase their exposure without establishing a permanent office location in a city.

Turnkey Office Space, a leading countrywide online search service for businesses in need of office space, recently released a statement about the growing popularity of utilizing virtual office space to help businesses broaden their customer reach.

Virtual offices offer companies professional business services without having to pay for the overhead costs of a permanent office location. Often utilized by start-up or growing companies because they are considerably cheaper than permanent locations, virtual offices help expand a company’s corporate identity. Companies that already have an office in one city but perhaps want to expand their presence into another also benefit from this strategy.

Co-founder Jonathan Bachrach believes appearance can be crucial when establishing trust with customers, vendors and industry peers. By giving the appearance of having a broad national reach, companies may find it easier to expand their customer base and to establish that level of trust that is so crucial for startups from the outset.

Virtual office packages include services and amenities such as a professional mailing address at a prestigious location with mail-forwarding; professional reception services to answer calls, send faxes, make copies, and schedule meetings; and access to day offices or meeting rooms a few days per month.

“Startups need all the leverage they can get,” said Bachrach. “Virtual offices help give new companies the presence they need at low, cost-effective rates. Associating your company with a Park Avenue or Beverly Hills address and having a receptionist answer your calls can be a great way to start getting noticed. Having multiple virtual offices in different cities is a great, cost-effective way to accomplish this.”

According to a recent March 5, 2014 article by News and Features Editor Jo Disney of Officing Today titled “So How Do you Run a Virtual Office, Anyway?” virtual offices are also ideal for anyone who wants to protect their home address. Plus, with the increase in digital office experience as technology continues to become more sophisticated, day-to-day communication, document sharing, presentations and keeping track of a team are all easily achieved virtually.

“The 21st century is all about efficiency and financial responsibility for businesses in a struggling economy,” said Bachrach. “A company transitioning away from a traditional office and into a virtual office will experience environmental benefits, increased productivity levels from staff and of course a large financial saving on office space. What more can you ask for?”

About Turnkey Office Space: Turnkey Office Space is a countrywide search and consulting services for companies seeking office space. They specialize in office suites, virtual offices, and co-working spaces. Turnkey can be reached via their website turnkeyofficespace.com and by phone at 1-888-282-8555.

Turnkey Office Space Brings a Personal Touch to the Workspace Industry

An NYC-based online search service that helps companies find great office space solutions for their business is now open.

Co-founder Jonathan Bachrach explains how Turnkey’s service will offer customized searches and dedicated consulting.

Looking for office space online leads to an assortment of search and consulting websites. Typically, these websites let people browse through properties by region, and then (depending on which properties the clients choose) put them in touch with the building managers.

“It’s all about user experience,” says Turnkey Office Space co-founder, Jonathan Bachrach. Jon knows the insides of this system because he worked for one of the largest office search and consulting companies in the world. “We wanted to start a company that offers something more personal and provides individuals and companies with workspace solutions that they would not have found otherwise. Starting a business is difficult enough, and every aspect matters. Our personalized approach allows people to focus on their businesses while we focus on their office search.

Bachrach also mentions that his company will provide you with everything the major search and consulting companies offer plus:

-A tailored, pre-qualified list of recommendations

-Price negotiation to help companies find the best values on the market

-Alerts for special deals

-In-depth knowledge of the industry

-Non-traditional office solutions

Turnkey Office Space works with all of the major workspace management companies in major cities throughout the US, but they are also focused on giving attention to the smaller markets and providers as well. “By having a solid understanding of the many different styles and types of office suite providers in each market, our personalized approach allows us to provide options that are tailored to a company’s specific needs. Our goal is to provide our clients with the right space, not the most popular one,” says Bachrach.

Turnkey Office Space is a countrywide search and consulting company for workspace. They specialize in office suites, virtual offices, and coworking spaces. Turnkey can be reached via their website https://www.turnkeyofficespace.com and by phone at 1-888-282-8555.