Look for These Warning Signs Before You Rent an Office

You don’t want to end up in a frustrating or toxic office environment. Protect yourself by looking out for these warning signs during your viewings.

As a business owner, there’s nothing more stressful than a poor relationship with your landlord. You can fire bad employees and clients whenever you want, but you can’t separate yourself as easily from the person who owns your workspace.

It’s critical, therefore, that you take every precaution you can to avoid getting into toxic rental situations. While you can’t see the future and some problems are inevitable, you can mitigate the risk by looking out for these warning signs. If any of these become apparent during your viewings or conversations with property owners/managers, you should find a new work environment.

(Related: 4 Things to Look for When Viewing Potential Office Space)

Free download: Critical Questions to Ask the Property Owner Before Renting Office Space

The exterior and common areas look neglected

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Even if the interior of your unit looks immaculate, you should look at the exterior of the building and any common areas, such as hallways, break rooms, bathrooms, lobbies, stairwells, etc.

A property manager or building owner may spruce up the interior because that’s what most people care about. But maintaining the exterior of the building is often costly and time consuming.

Even if your unit looks fine, you have to assume the lowest form of maintenance is what you’ll end up with. So if the lawn is unkempt, the parking lot is littered, and the lobby is a mess, assume your unit will end up in that condition one day and the owner won’t do anything about it.

This is a bigger problem if your business intends to bring clients to the office. Your clients will judge everything they see, even if it’s not technically your problem. A dirty bathroom will make your clients wonder what else you aren’t managing, even if that bathroom is community space.

“I’ll show you a similar unit”

Sometimes less-than-honest landlords will offer to show you a unit that “looks exactly like the one you’ll be renting.” They offer all types of excuses. They might say that it’s occupied and the tenant doesn’t give him permission to enter (which is nonsense because every landlord writes a walkthrough provision into the lease) or it’s under construction (again this is nonsense because it doesn’t prevent you from seeing it).

Never sign a rental agreement unless you have physically stood in the unit mentioned on the lease. We always tell our clients to arrange a full viewing of the unit and property they’ll be renting. If the landlord says he/she can’t show you something that you’ll be paying for, run away.

The owner doesn’t want to sign an agreement

People make a lot of mistakes regarding rental agreements. The biggest one you could make is not having one.

Property owners sometimes want to avoid leases for different reasons. Some want to avoid paying taxes on the income. In some cases, the space isn’t zoned for commercial use or the owner doesn’t have the right paperwork/licenses/certifications in place. In the worst cases, the owner is actively looking to take advantage of you.

Truthfully, this happens more often in residential renting than commercial office space, but it does happen. Even if the property owner offers you an attractive arrangement in exchange for untraceable cash payments, it’s still in your best interest to have an agreement.

Here are a few problems you could experience if you don’t have a rental agreement.

1. You could be evicted early.

Since there’s no official agreement, the property owner can have you removed at any time. In some states you can prove occupancy without a lease, but that takes time, stress, and money to fight. Experts at Real Estate Lawyers agree. They also suggest a common way un-leased renters can be evicted:

“It is better to rent commercial property with a lease agreement, given the possible liability associated with renting. For example, if someone does not have a lease and their property owner decides to sell the property where the business is located, there is no lease to prevent the new owners from giving notice that they would like you to vacate the property. Without a lease, the new owners would be able to tell you to find a new location for your business.”

2. You could lose any money you put into the unit.

Small businesses don’t usually incur a lot of expenses when moving into a unit, but there are some. For instance, you might buy office furniture that fits the space or maybe a yearly parking pass in a nearby garage. If you are suddenly evicted, you could lose those investments.

3. Your rent could suddenly increase.

If you don’t have a lease, there’s technically no legal rental price. The property owner can demand a bigger rent at any time and your only recourse is to move. Sometimes unscrupulous landlords will bait-and-switch you by letting you in without a lease and then requiring you to sign one at a higher rent.

4. The owner might not perform maintenance or repairs.

Lack of a rental agreement means the landlord isn’t legally liable for basic repairs (excluding repairs relating to health and safety, which they would have to handle even if the unit was empty). You’ll have to pay out of your pocket even for the simplest things, like new lightbulbs or worn carpeting.

Remember: A rental agreement should be in place as much to protect you as the property owner. If the landlord refuses, so should you.

The owner won’t answer questions

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Naturally, you’ll have questions for the property owner or manager. Who will handle repairs? Who do you call if the building is locked? Who do you call if someone is parked in your spot? How are conflicts resolved between tenants?

In turnkey spaces, the tenant relies on the property owner for more services than they would in a traditional lease. The owner might pay for high-speed Internet, phone lines, a shared receptionist, or a hundred other things. As a potential tenant, you would have questions about all of this.

But if the landlord doesn’t have answers to your questions, they either aren’t taking the arrangement seriously, don’t know what they’re doing, or don’t intend to abide by any of the promises they’re making. Either scenario is bad for you.

A good landlord that wants to provide a quality space and build a long term relationship with you should be happy to answer your questions. It’s in their best interest. If you get vague responses or “don’t worry about it,” look elsewhere.

The owner is difficult to deal with

Even if there’s nothing wrong with the unit, you can get an impression of what renting will be like by having a simple conversation with the property owner (or whomever is your point-of-contact). Assess this person carefully. Are they pleased to have a new tenant? Are they proud of their building and business? Are they protective of their other tenants?

People are usually on their best behavior when they’re on first dates and job interviews. If the property owner is distant, distracted, dismissive, or doesn’t seem to have time for you, chances are that won’t change once you’ve signed an agreement. Don’t waste your time trying to work with someone who isn’t willing to invest into the relationship.

Download this free list of questions you should ask at any office space viewing.

Whatever you do, don’t settle

There are likely more available office units available than you know. Most are off the main road without signage. You don’t have to settle on the first property you see. The property owner/manager might try to influence your decision with something like “There isn’t much else available in the area,” but that probably isn’t true.

Make sure you find the right space for your business. The success of your business and your team depends on it. We insist that our customers schedule multiple viewings so they can get a feel for what’s available and what they need. Find your next office today.

12 Common Office Leasing Mistakes You Should Avoid

Renting office space doesn’t have to be complicated. Here are the most common office renting mistakes and how you can avoid them.

Renting office space is an exciting time for your business, but it’s also one of the biggest decisions you’ll have to make. After payroll, it’s likely to be your largest expense. You owe it to yourself to be as educated as possible to avoid a bad deal.

If this is your first time renting office space, you’re bound to make some type of error. That’s part of the learning process. But it’s best to insulate yourself from costly mistakes as much as possible so you don’t handicap your company’s growth.

Below you’ll find the most common mistakes businesses make when they rent office space and how you can avoid them.

Is this your first time renting office space? Download our free guide that explains the process step by step.

1. Rushing in Without a Plan

renting-office-space-without-plan

Before you make the jump to your own office you need to have a plan. Sit down with your key employees and figure out what your business needs in terms of office space. Ask yourself some questions.

  • How much room do you need?
  • What amenities do you need?
  • Do you require a specific layout (like open space or separate offices)?
  • Does it need to accommodate clients, customers or equipment?
  • Will you be bringing in your own furniture or do you require furnishings?
  • Do you know what you can afford to spend?
  • Which areas do you prefer?
  • Does parking or security matter?

Companies who rush through the process and don’t take the time to consider their needs objectively regret it later on.

2. Failing to Read the Rental Agreement

It’s amazing how many people don’t read the things they sign. They usually figure they don’t need to because they’ve already spoken with the landlord/property manager/realtor. Sometimes they assume they don’t wouldn’t understand the terms anyway.

“While a lease allows tenants to stake their claim on a particular space, it can also end up trapping them in an environment that doesn’t live up to expectations,” says Ron Bockstahler of Amata Office Solutions, a real estate provider of massive corporate offices. It’s important to read the lease so you don’t get trapped in something unsuitable. If something is incorrect, you could be obligated to honor what you signed.

We recommend turnkey office spaces to our clients because they come with short, easy to understand agreements without hundreds of clauses.

3. Renting an Unseen Unit

Busy people are often tempted to agree to rent a unit without seeing it first. This is always a mistake. Even if you are given pictures, you can’t be sure what you’re renting until you actually stand in the space.

Clever photography and well-crafted ad copy can be deceiving and won’t give you an idea of the area or any odors or noise. Plus, can you visualize what 1000, 1500 or 2000 square feet of space looks like?

If a property owner isn’t willing to let you into a unit before signing an agreement or taking some money, the opportunity is most definitely a scam. Immediately stop speaking to the scammer.

4. Not Consulting Your Employees

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It’s best to have a discussion with your employees before you rent a particular space. Find out if anyone has any problems with the unit, the commute, the parking, or the neighborhood. You can’t please everyone, but it’s smart to ask their opinions in case there’s a problem you didn’t foresee.

5. Not Documenting the Unit’s Condition

At the end of your lease, you’ll be billed for any damages or alterations you caused. Sometimes tenants get accidentally charged for things that were already there.

It’s a smart idea to take photos or video of the unit during your walkthrough or just before you sign your agreement. Even if the landlord has photos, there’s no telling if they’re accurate or unaltered, so obtain your own. Look for dents or chips in the wall, carpet stains, window cracks, or anything that doesn’t work properly.

Send your photos to the landlord immediately so you have dated communication. Explain that you don’t mind the imperfections, but you’re speaking up so you don’t get charged at the end of the term.

6. Forgetting Renters Insurance

The owner of the building will have insurance on the property, but not your belongings. If you have any property or equipment you wouldn’t want to lose (like computers or electronic devices), I strongly recommend buying renters insurance. It only costs a few hundred dollars for the year, yet (shockingly) only 37% of renters buy it, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

7. Only Viewing One Property

If you rent the first property you see, you’re setting yourself up for a bad experience. This is especially true if you’ve never rented office space before. You need to see multiple units to get a grasp of what you like and don’t like. For instance, you may not know you want lots of natural light until you see a unit with big windows.

Furthermore, viewing multiple properties gives you leverage with the property owners. You get to say something like “I’m seeing five spaces today. I’ll let you know what I decide.” Language like that tells the property owner that he has to compete with other units.

8. Failing to Benchmark Similar Properties

Before you buy anything, you should make sure you’re paying a fair price. Office space is no exception.

The best way to do this is to arrange appointments to view multiple properties and spend a few minutes glancing through ads. Compare units with similar square footage and amenities to the one you like. Is the price reasonable? Does it feel like a value?

9. Failing to Negotiate

Just because you’re renting a small unit with a simple lease doesn’t mean you can’t negotiate. In fact, property owners expect it. In the case of a turnkey space, you be able to negotiate alterations to the space, but you can haggle over your overall rent and which amenities you have access to (like common areas and shared receptionists).

10. Falling in Love

falling-in-love-office-space

Sometimes a renter will fall in love with a particular location. They’ll love the lighting, the layout, the furniture (if provided), or maybe the neighborhood. It’s good to enjoy your space, but make sure it serves your business’ purposes. Is it worth cramming into a small room just to have a coffee shop nearby? Are you willing to spend extra to be right on the main road?

“You have to go into negotiations knowing that if you don’t get a fair deal, you can move on and your business will thrive elsewhere,” says serial entrepreneur Melody Stevens. Don’t let your emotions cloud your judgement.

11. Miscalculating Growth

When you rent space, it’s important to consider your company’s future size. How many people will you have? Will you be buying new equipment that requires spaces? Will the growth be steady and predictable, or sudden and urgent?

If you miscalculate growth, you might end up in a space that’s too small for your company, or a space that’s too large and waste of money. Take some time to figure out what your company will look like by the end of the rental term.

Career and Workplace Expert Heather R. Huhman recommends anticipating product launches, expansions, employee turnover, industry changes, new business investment, and your goals.

12. Being Picky with Location

Yes, it’s important to find a great location, but there are probably lots of suitable areas within a reasonable commuting distance. Instead of limiting your search to an area you like, figure out what you like about it. You may like the closeness to public transportation or the nearby healthy lunch options. Measure new areas against your requirements.

Don’t begin the rental process without an idea of how it works. Subscribe to receive our free step by step guide on renting office space.

As you view properties and move through the renting process, keep these mistakes at the forefront of your mind. If you can avoid making common errors, you’ll land a quality unit that supports your business’ growth without cumbersome expenses and hassles.

Can You Afford to Rent Office Space?

Renting office space is a big step for your business. Before you visit properties, ask what you can truly afford.

When you begin dreaming about working in your own professional office space, you’ll likely have visions of trendy layouts, colorful walls, and ergonomic chairs. You’ll imagine yourself tossing a ball around with your team while you brainstorm ideas and impressing clients with gourmet coffee. Hey, maybe there will be a foosball table!

It’s great that you have big dreams, but in business, everything boils down to one factor: cost. Before you start visiting properties and signing paperwork, you have to understand what you can afford.

Are you truly prepared to sign an office space lease? Ask yourself these questions before you sign.

Evaluating Your Budget

evaluating-your-budget

Ideally, you should have a thorough business plan that projects your expenses over a few years. A business plan is a fantastic document that not only gives you an overview of your company now, but makes educated predictions about what your company will look like in the future.

But if you’re a little less prepared, don’t fear. You’re in the same boat as many entrepreneurs. In fact, U.S. Trust found that “A large number of business owners have not articulated a strategy…” All you need is a careful understanding of your budget.

(I’m going to give a basic budgeting overview, but Info Entrepreneurs has an excellent guide.)

Step 1: Calculate your income

Gather all information about monthly income you can depend on. In this category, you should round all of your numbers down. Use worst-case scenarios.

Don’t use last year’s numbers. Use what you can expect next year. For instance, if you made $25,000 at a trade show, but don’t plan to attend it this year, you wouldn’t calculate that as income.

Step 2: Calculate your fixed costs

Add all of the costs you expect each month. This category includes salaries, licensing fees, insurance, fees, web hosting, and anything you’re paying for your current workspace.

Step 3: Calculate your variable expenses

These are expenses that may change each month. It includes items like utility bills, material costs, commissions, marketing costs, travel, equipment rental fees, etc. Most of these expenses scale up or down with your sales, so when the bills get higher, you’re also making more money.

Step 4: Predict big expenses

This is tough, but necessary. Consider any big purchases you’ll have to make within the next few years. You won’t be able to predict everything (like a broken computer, which will happen unexpectedly), but new hires or equipment usually have some lead time.

Distribute these expenses into the months leading up to the purchase. For instance, if your expenses total $5,500/month and you have a $2,000 purchase coming up in six months, your actual expenses are $5,833.33 per month for the next six months.

Step 5: Look at the big picture

Now that you know where your money is coming from and where it’s going, put everything together. How much is left over each month after your expenses are covered? This is how much you can spend on growth, including new office space. Ideally your income will grow over time, so your office space will eventually require a smaller percentage of your income (although it should never be more than 10%).

Keep in mind that was just a light overview. Business budgeting can be a complex process depending on your unique situation. However you do it, just make sure you know how much money you have available before you begin looking at potential office spaces. It may seem obvious, but many business owners fail to make these calculations.

The Hidden Costs of Office Space

hidden-office-costs

If the lease and utilities were the only costs you had to consider, office space would be quite affordable and available to more people. Unfortunately, your costs don’t end there. There are some significant hidden expenses that many new lessees fail to consider.

1. Office furniture

People need to sit, right? You’ll need desks and chairs, which can add up quickly depending on the models you choose. If your staff sits for long periods of time, you can’t buy poor-quality chairs or they’ll quickly complain of back problems. Sure, you can buy cheap or snag free furniture off Craigslist, but it likely won’t last long.

2. Office supplies

Even if your team has always worked remotely and paid for their own expenses in the past, they’ll expect you to provide office supplies once everyone moves into the office. These are recurring expenses you should plan for every month. Your team will need basic items like pens, calendars, printer paper and ink, mouse pads, highlighters, etc.

3. Technology

Your staff used their home computers before, but they won’t be willing to haul their desktops to work every day. You’ll have to invest in new machines to keep the work moving. If your technology needs are high (like drafting equipment, servers, or 3D printers), you may have to pick up new units.

4. Move-in expenses

Depending on the equipment you need, moving in might be a challenge. You may have a few desks, chairs, or maybe a copier sitting around your garage. You can save money by using what you have, but getting to your office space might require renting a truck.

5. Liability or property insurance

Anticipating lawsuits are a part of doing business. Many landlords require the lessee to take out insurance with the lessor named as the additional insured. Since you won’t be doing anything industrial, this won’t be terribly expensive, but it’s a cost many businesses fail to consider.

6. Property taxes

Many leases require the lessee to pay a prorated portion of the site’s property taxes. (If this isn’t listed as its own line item, it’s already been rolled into your rent.) Make sure you’re aware of this charge (and all other charges) before you sign the lease.

7. Common area fees

If your office space shares common areas with other businesses on the site (like parking lots, bathrooms, or waiting areas), make sure you understand the fee structure and how you benefit. You don’t want to be surprised by a hefty fee for a shared receptionist you don’t intend to use.

8. Overtime utilities

In many leases, the utilities are included in the rent as long as they are used during normal business hours (typically set as 7 AM to 6 PM). If you use power, water, gas, or oil outside of those hours, you’ll pay additional fees. If you have a charge like this, make sure you understand how it lines up with your working hours.

9. Communication services

Telephones, Internet, and cable services are rarely included under utilities, although many lessees make the mistake of assuming they do. You’ll have to cover these costs yourself.

Think About the Future

When you lease office space, you’re investing in the future of your company. Naturally, you expect the business to grow, make more money, hire more people, and generally get bigger.

But in most cases, your office space won’t.

Sure, some locations offer nearby units you can grow into. Maybe there’s room for construction and expansion. But the building owner isn’t going to hold that space for you. There’s no guarantee the extra space will be available when you need it.

Before you sign the lease, think about your future. In what ways will your company grow? Will you need more space for people or equipment (both have different needs in space)? Will you need to switch from an open layout to closable offices? Will you need a reception area?

Most importantly, think of your future cash situation. How will growth affect your cash flow? For instance, maybe penetrating a new market will tie up all your cash, so it’s best to sign a smaller lease than you can afford right now.

Before you formalize a new office space agreement, ask yourself these questions. Subscribe to download this free resource.

Going Forward

There are spaces nearby that you probably aren’t aware of. If your budget feels tight, remember that there are all sorts of office types available. You don’t have to rent a large, elaborate space with a complex, tough-to-negotiate lease. A turnkey unit (with furnishings and a hassle-free rental agreement) might be just the thing your growing business needs.

If your business needs its own space, you can search for office space in your area now. If you have questions about whether you can afford space, speak with us.

Turnkey Office Space Comments on Recent San Francisco Commercial Office Space Report

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A report released earlier this month has found San Francisco office rents are projected to surpass New York City office rents in the near future.

Turnkey Office Space, a nationwide office space search service that specializes in commercial office space in major metropolitan areas, released a comment today following a new research report by CBRE, the world’s largest commercial real estate brokerage.

The report, published in Bloomberg titled “San Francisco Office Rents Seen Topping Manhattan in 2015” by Dan Levy (August 14, 2014), found that the average monthly rental charge for commercial office space on the West Coast, particularly in San Francisco, is expected to rise by the end of 2015. While San Francisco office rates are currently on average at $31.50 a square foot, they could rise as high as $69.71 a square foot by the end of next year, according to CBRE.

San Francisco has grown into a major technology hub, with currently under three-quarters of the rented commercial space occupied by technology firms and start-ups. If the rental rate increase occurs as projected, this would be the first time office space in a city on the West Coast has exceeded the cost of office space in New York City since the dot-com bubble in 2000.

According to the team at Turnkey Office Space, the commercial office space in San Francisco’s financial district is already on average pricier than downtown New York City. Nevertheless, the company has experienced increased interest in the San Francisco Bay area by current and potential clients.

The popularity of West Coast office space comes during a time when Manhattan office space construction is on pace to hit a 25 year high. Experts at Turnkey Office Space believe this could result in newly constructed office space for more affordable prices in New York City to compete with their West Coast counterpart.

For companies currently located in California, and specifically San Francisco, Jonathan Bachrach, Managing Director of Turnkey Office Space, believes the increased rental rates are driving some companies out of San Francisco. Many companies are currently searching for spaces a mere 11 miles westward in the city of Oakland, CA, where more affordable options are available.

“We, as a company, have noticed a marked increase in demand for office space in the Oakland area, where commercial office space rent is overall a cheaper investment for start-up companies,” said Bachrach. “As the city of San Francisco becomes home to the most expensive real estate in the country, we expect more small businesses to set-up shop in cities like Oakland and Berkeley. But, to be honest, I would not be surprised if we see those rental rates climb as well in the next year due to their proximity.”

About Turnkey Office Space: Turnkey Office Space is a countrywide search and consulting services for companies seeking office space. They specialize in office suites, virtual offices, and co-working spaces. Turnkey can be reached via their websitehttps://www.turnkeyofficespace.com and by phone at 1-888-282-8555.

Serviced Offices May Rival Traditional Spaces in 2014

Because of the JOBS Act, Turnkey Office Space’s Jon Bachrach projects a significant increase in companies seeking office suites in the next 12 months.

Statistics taken from a variety of sources including Regus, OfficingToday, and Deskmag were processed by research analyst Jon Bachrach. Bachrach reveals a significant increase in office suite demand for 2014. Office suites (also known as executive suites and serviced offices) are all-inclusive office spaces that typically come furnished. They differ from traditional offices because of their flexible lease options and their built-in amenities, but Bachrach says there are other reasons why these are on the rise.

“What really stands out is the retention rate among current tenants. Companies that initially signed for a 3 or 6 month duration are recognizing the long-term benefits that Executive Suites provide. What was initially a temporary solution for many business is now becoming a more permanent one.

The Americas have experienced a 13% growth in serviced offices this year. In 2014, around a quarter of US businesses plan to increase their staff by 25%, and the JOBS Act of 2013 is making it easier for new businesses to grow. Executive Suites can reduce infrastructure costs by up to 60% and remove leases from a company’s balance sheet.

“It makes sense especially for businesses looking to get started quickly. With a traditional office, you have moving costs, cable and internet concerns, infrastructure build-outs; these office suites are ready-to-move-into on day one,” says Bachrach. “In addition, the highly efficient design of these types of work spaces allows companies to rent less space at lower costs.”

Turnkey Office Space is a countrywide search and consulting services for companies seeking office space. They specialize in office suites, virtual offices, and coworking spaces. Turnkey can be reached via their website https://www.turnkeyofficespace.com and by phone at 1-888-282-8555.

The Evolution of the Cubicle

The first office was a dark, small wooden room – the walls glowed from the light of oil lamps and a pot-bellied stove kept the workers (or clerks, as they were known as) warm.

Or that’s what we can assume it was like back in the mid 1800s when the concept of the office workspace first started to develop.

The offices of the early 1900s felt like enormous classrooms. Rows upon rows of desks, each with one or two people working, typewriters clacking away below clouds of cigarette smoke, while executives and managers worked in private rooms along the floor’s perimeter. It wasn’t until the 1960s that architects began to seriously conceptualize office structure. A group of German designers pioneered the original open office floor plan called ‘Office Landscape’ or ‘Bürolandschaft’. Its objective was to eliminate hierarchy, all levels were haphazardly arranged in clusters surrounded by transparent partitions and plants. People despised this design, all of the typing and chatter made concentrating difficult and after a couple of years, the concept was discarded.

In 1964, furniture designer Robert Propst came up with the ‘Action Office’, a floor plan that gave workers the illusion of privacy and promoted autonomy. Each desk was long and rounded and featured a mobile, fabric-covered partition on either side, which blocked any external loud noise and prevented distraction, yet its semi-openness encouraged open communication between colleagues. The Action
Office debuted at the Federal Reserve in New York and soon after many businesses purchased the design.

Yet, what Propst never anticipated was his product’s eventual transformation into the cubicle. Managers discovered that by adding an additional partition, they could squeeze twice as many workers into the office space. By 2005, 40 million Americans were working in 42 different versions of Propst’s design except they were all called “the cubicle”.

Over the last couple of decades, the cubicle has gone through some serious transformations. In this current start-up climate, most tech businesses have re-replaced the cubicle with the open floor plan. But remnants of the cubicle remain, many offices feature conference booths which have a cube shape and two tall, fabric-covered partitions. These booths are scattered around the office and are available for meetings or as optional private spaces.

On the hunt for the perfect cubicle, open floor plan or turn of the century merchant office? Check out Turnkey Office Spacelistings now!

NYC Creates Super Bowl Boulevard, Boosts Businesses!

It’s almost that time again – that special American holiday featuring deliciously unhealthy food, beer, and shouting at a TV.

Hmmm…that could actually be a lot of American holidays. The Super Bowl will commence at 6:30PM EST on February 2nd with the Seattle Seahawks up against the Denver Broncos. In honor of the event, New York City is hosting a number of NFL-themed events along a strip in Times Square.
Super Bowl Boulevard will be located between 34th Street and 47th Street on Broadway. The festivities have already begun.

But what does this all mean for local businesses? We predict great returns. Tourism, location, and the Super Bowl event will all factor into a grand increase in sales. The fanfare is so massive this year that even non-sports-lovers might want in on the action. Expect special deals on drinks and foods, live music, and more.

If you’re a startup business in NYC, you might want to take advantage of this influx in spending and foot traffic. If there was ever a time to hand out promotional material, this would be it.

Are there downsides to the Super Bowlevard? Of course. Traffic jams, heavy drinking, and claustrophobia just to name a few. We want to warn anyone who is looking for office space in Times Square that this won’t be the last of the colossal events held right outside your window.

When searching for offices in NYC, there’s so much to consider. Neighborhoods rise and fall like the stock market, and depending on what kind of business you own, you might want to consider a different location than the all-popular Times Square. Still, some businesses need the Time Square advantage.

Got a thought about the Super Bowlevard? Let us know on our Facebook page. If you need tips on where to find office space in NYC, give us a call.

Don’t Die Cubicle Man!!!!

We recently discovered the now viral video made by Mark McNease entitled The Slow Death of Cubicle Life (part II). If you haven’t seen this yet, check it out now. What’s brilliant is McNease’s slow, softly-spoken dark humor; but we also saw some truth in this video as well.

Tightly packed cubicle life in an office with no character has serious drawbacks. As Mark put it “this is where I sit all day long and lose my mind.”

McNease describes his video as “a sad continuation of psychological torture,” which a bad office space can certainly feel like at times.
The great thing about the kinds of offices we provide at Turnkey Office Space is that they are:

A) Excellently decorated with a full suite of amenities built into the lease, and…

B) Short-term commitments! So let’s say you move into one of our offices and you’re your business starts to expand. Pretty soon your employees need to cram into a space originally designed to hold half the size. In a traditional office, you’d be out of luck – traditional spaces typically require five-year lease agreements. With our offices, you can sign a lease agreement as short as three-months! Just call us up again and say “we’ve out-grown this space, let’s start looking for bigger!”

Our sincere condolences to Mark McNease for his depressing cubicle life – even though your video is hilarious. We understand the importance of being in an office that’s spacious and conducive to productivity.
For more information on the office spaces we provide, contact us directly!

Top Five Signs You’re Gonna Need a Bigger Office

Think of Roy Scheider causally chumming the Atlantic Ocean when Jaws suddenly surfaces – gnashing his terrible teeth.

Roy walks backward slowly and makes his way to Quint, the captain. His eyes fixed on the water. His cigarette hanging on his lips. Finally, he says, “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.”

Now think of what this moment was for you. Perhaps you were with a few colleagues, enjoying the view of the vacant lot from your second story office, and suddenly your inbox went from 10 unread inquiries to 300.

In case your own personal Jaws hasn’t reared its head yet, we’ve got some tips for you concerning the warning signs that you may need a bigger office:

1. You’re turning down clients – the biggest indicator that you need more office space is a simple one: If the demand for your product or service has surpassed your ability to provide, you need to bite the bullet and move on up. Hire more and get a bigger space. Congrats, you’ve just reached level 2 in the game of business.

2. You literally bump into your employees multiple times per day – humans need personal space. If you find that you can’t get to the copy machine without an “excuse me”, pack it up and get a bigger office.

3. You can never find anything – a small office does not mean a more organized office. A larger space can give you more room to store important things (instead of shoving everything on top of the filing cabinet).

4. You’re ashamed to bring clients back to your office – this should be a giant red flag. Whatever your business is, you should never feel ashamed to bring anyone back to the office. Now, your car, on the other hand, is different. Why are there so many unfinished diet coke cans? I don’t know, just move them to the side and sit down.

5. You can’t stop fantasizing about being in a bigger office – listen to your gut! It’s telling you that you’re too big for this space. And if you’re thinking about it, you can bet your colleagues are as well. Making the move into a bigger office might seem daunting at first, but in the long run it’ll improve the morale, organization, and overall functionality of your business.